Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies Program on Energy and Sustainable Development Stanford University


Publications




Taiwan's Maturing Democracy

Commentary

Authors
Larry Diamond - Director at Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law at Stanford University
Nigel Li - Adjunct Professor, Graduate School of Law, Soochow University Adjunct Professor, Graduate Institute of Political Science, National Taiwan University
Jiunn-rong Yeh - Professor, College of Law, National Taiwan University
Eric Chen-hua Yu, - Assistant Professor of Political Science, National Chengchi University
Da-Chi Liao - Professor of Political Science, National Sun Yat-sen University

Published
May 2012


On May 14, the Center for Northeast Asian Policy Studies (CNAPS) at Brookings and the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law (CDDRL) at Stanford University hosted a seminar analyzing progress and challenges in the consolidation of Taiwan’s democratization and reforms. While the presidential and legislative elections held on January 14 were interpreted by many as proof that Taiwan’s democratic system—including its government and society—has matured since the first transition of political power in 2000, both big-picture and day-to-day challenges to effective democratic governance remain.

The seminar featured leading practitioners and political scientists from Taiwan and the United States. Panelists examined reforms that have been enacted in Taiwan over the past decade, and analyzed their impact on the functions of government agencies, political parties, and other non-governmental organizations. They also discussed how reform and consolidation are affecting policy and public perception of the system.