Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies Program on Energy and Sustainable Development Stanford University


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Thomas Fingar, PhD

Oksenberg-Rohlen Distinguished Fellow

View Thomas Fingar's bio, list of research, recent publications and events »


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December 16th, 2013

Suspicion and mutual distrust may threaten U.S.-China relationship

CISAC, Shorenstein APARC, SCP Op-ed: The Washington Quarterly

Thomas Fingar and former CISAC Visiting Scholar Fan Jishe write that the U.S.-China relationship is stronger and more interdependent than ever, but mutual suspicion and distrust persists. They argue that four decades of stability have taught Beijing and Washington how to manage their relationship. Read more »



August 28th, 2013

Experts on intelligence, terrorism, international law and Mideast policy examine Syrian conflict

CISAC, FSI Stanford Q&A

While the U.S. weighs options and rallies its allies for a possible military strike against Syria, Stanford experts consider the implications of an attack on Damascus. +VIDEO+
Read more »



June 26th, 2013

PRC-ROK summit underscores shared interests and common concerns

CISAC, Shorenstein APARC, KSP Op-ed: The Financial Times (in Chinese language)

Shorenstein APARC experts comment that South Korean President Park Geun-hye's visit to China this week attests to the magnitude and importance of geostrategic changes in Northeast Asia. Read more »



June 13th, 2013

What we need to know about PRISM

CISAC in the news

Following revelations of the NSA's massive public surveillance program, called PRISM, CISAC cyber and intelligence experts respond with important questions necessary for an informed policy debate, and tell us that terrorists were already aware of increased surveillance. Read more »



June 12th, 2013

Surveillance exposures more of a wake-up call than an alarm to terrorists

CISAC in the news: Bloomberg News on June 11, 2013

Former Deputy Director of National Intelligence Thomas Fingar spoke with news websites about the disclosure of U.S. surveillance programs. Fingar said that although these revelations may cause some terrorists to change their behavior, it's likely that they were already aware of increased electronic surveillance.





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News around the web

The Way China Copes With Its Economic Challenges Will Have an Impact on Us All
Thomas Fingar: "For the past two decades China has been a poster child of successful globalization, integrating with the world and in the process lifting millions of citizens out of poverty. But China’s integration into the world economy and global trends drive and constrain Beijing’s ability to manage growing social, economic and political challenges."
January 19, 2012 in Jakarta Globe

In North Africa, Power Map No Longer Drawn In Ink
"The pace of change, the magnitude of demands, is going to make for not much sleep," says Thomas Fingar, former chair of the National Intelligence Council who's now a fellow at Stanford University. For intelligence officers in Cairo, the job may have ...
March 11, 2011 in NPR

Don't overreact to WikiLeaks
"The WikiLeaks dissemination of U.S. diplomatic and other candid communications has rekindled debate over how to balance the need to protect sources and sensitive information against the need to ensure timely distribution of information to government officials who need it to protect our people ...
January 19, 2011 in Arizona Daily Sun

Overseas programs assess enrollment, effects of Beijing language waiver
... full enrollment may have been caused by the waived language requirement and the addition of Stanford faculty member Thomas Fingar MA '69 Ph.D. '77, ...
December 1, 2010 in The Stanford Daily

Five years later, a stronger intelligence community
"Commentators noting the fifth anniversary, this month, of the launch of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence have largely paid more attention to shortcomings than to what has been achieved ...
April 30, 2010 in Washington Post