Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies Program on Energy and Sustainable Development Stanford University


Muhammad Naeem (L), a spokesman for the Office of the Taliban of Afghanistan speaks during the opening of the Taliban Afghanistan Political Office in Doha June 18, 2013. The Afghan Taliban opened an office in Qatar on Tuesday to help restart talks on ending the 12-year-old war.
Photo credit: Reuters



May 1, 2013 - CISAC, FSI Stanford, CDDRL News

Stanford scholars: Lessons learned from the Afghanistan War

By Beth Duff-Brown and Adam Gorlick

 

More than 2,860 American and allied troops have been killed in the Afghanistan war, which was launched in the wake of the 9/11 terrorist attacks to avenge the deaths of nearly 3,000 civilians. As many as 17,500 Afghan civilians have lost their lives in America's second-longest war. The U.S. military intends to withdraw its combat troops from Afghanistan by the end of 2014, closing a chapter in American history that has largely been dropped from the headlines and the collective consciousness of the American people.

Stanford scholars and military experts, including Karl Eikenberry, Joseph Felter, J.B. Vowell, Viet Luong, Anja Manuel and Erik Jensen, talk about the lessons learned, the gains and losses and what to expect after the war formally comes to an end.




Topics: Afghanistan war and reconstruction | Military | Afghanistan